Guest appearance on The Dangerous History Podcast episode 156. A Modern-Day Grunt’s Perspective.

Link to the third interview episode on DHP Link to the second interview episode on DHP Link to the first interview episode on DHP Notes for the DHP interview episodes   From ProfCJ's description of the episode. This is the second part of my conversation with BT, a US Army veteran of Iraq and Afghanistan, …

Continue reading Guest appearance on The Dangerous History Podcast episode 156. A Modern-Day Grunt’s Perspective.

Notes for ProfCJ’s Dangerous History Podcast. Episode 1.

Here is the link to my first interview on The Dangerous History Podcast. Below are my notes on the podcast. They are an outline, so the context is lost, without hearing the episode. I am posting this for anyone interested in the sources I utilized as well as the many statistics I quote in the …

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My opinion article on General Mattis: “Conventional forces will assume more special operations force roles in 2018.”

Before you read my opinion, I suggest any reader (that is you) examine the articles I am giving my opinion, because you will know I am not trying to mischaracterize something which is an unfortunate reality of our "journalist," of which I believe there are very few left. I also am not trying to change …

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An analysis of A Modest Proposal and The Declation of Independence

This is an analysis of two writings that I wrote for a college class back in 2016. I have only changed some grammatical errors. One group that Jonathan Swift places blame upon in “A Modest Proposal,” is the Catholic population who Swift explains as having a large number of children in the nine months preceding …

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From the illusions of romantic warfare to the carnage of a repugnant war. World War One and the impact on literature.

17 July 2016 How much of an impact can a single person have in the world? On June 28, 1914, Gavrilo Princip answered that question. Gavrilo fired shots into Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, igniting the powder keg of war. As a result of the assassination, in excess of 65 million soldiers were …

Continue reading From the illusions of romantic warfare to the carnage of a repugnant war. World War One and the impact on literature.